CBD has been used to treat chronic pain symptoms and reduce inflammation. It’s considered to be an alternative to taking addictive opioid prescriptions.

It’s important to note that CBD isn’t yet approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a regulated treatment option.

But a 2009 study found that CBD can be used for relieving neuropathic pain. And in two studies, CBD was used to treat inflammatory and neuropathic pain from nerve injury. Researchers found CBD to be an effective alternative treatment because it significantly reduced pain symptoms.

CBD treatment options

Cannabidiol products are used for the therapeutic benefits without experiencing psychoactive symptoms of medical marijuana. However, it can sometimes be difficult to find a product that only has CBD without THC. In this case, cannabis products that have both CBD and THC can still treat pain effectively.

You can consume CBD in a number of forms including:

  • Smoking or vaping. If you want to relieve immediate pain, smoking CBD-rich cannabis is the quickest way to reduce symptoms. Effects can last up to three hours. Smoking or vaping allows you to directly inhale CBD from the cannabis plant, absorbing the chemical into your bloodstream and lungs.
  • Edibles. Edibles are foods cooked with the cannabis plant, or cannabis-infused oil or butter. It will take longer to experience symptom relief, but the effects of edibles can last for up to six hours.
  • Topicals. CBD cannabis oils can be infused into topical creams and balms to apply directly to the skin. These CBD products can be an effective option for reducing inflammation and helping with external pain.
  • Oil extracts. Oils can be applied topically, taken orally, or dissolved under the tongue and absorbed in mouth tissues.

There may be respiratory risks to smoking or vaping marijuana. People with asthma or lung conditions shouldn’t use this method. You should also follow dosage instructions carefully, especially with edibles, to avoid negative side effects of taking too much.

CBD side effects

Cannabidiol is thought to be safe with minimal side effects. However, some have noted experiencing the following symptoms after using CBD:

  • dry mouth
  • slowed digestion
  • low blood pressure
  • lightheadedness
  • drowsiness
  • hallucinations
Outlook

Researchers are still testing the effectiveness of CBD to treat chronic pain disorders and further research is needed. There are some success stories with using CBD as a treatment option, but it’s not FDA approved and research has yet to show us the long-term effects of CBD on the body.

Until the FDA approves this treatment, traditional fibromyalgia treatment is recommended.

If you decide to use CBD products for pain management, be sure to consult with a doctor first to help avoid harmful interactions with your current medications and treatments, along with negative side effects.

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